‘Sweet Thames Flow Softly’.

Albert Bridge in fog, November 2015. © David Secombe

Albert Bridge in fog, 1st November 2015. © David Secombe

Happy New Year from The London Column.


Give a little Whistler.

The Thames at Chelsea in fog, November 2015. © David Secombe

The Thames at Chelsea in fog, November 2015. © David Secombe

From J.M. Whistler’s ’10 o’clock Lecture’, 1885, reprinted in The Gentle Art of Making Enemies, 1892:

And when the evening mist clothes the riverside with poetry, as with a veil, and the poor buildings lose themselves in the dim sky, and the tall chimneys become campanili, and the warehouses are palaces in the night, and the whole city hangs in the heavens, and fairyland is before us …

The recent fog in London, despite its inconvenience for air travellers, commuters, etc., proved to be quite a popular meteorological event: instead of invoking Bleak House’s November gloom it made the city look impossibly glamorous.  The above photo was taken on the evening of Sunday, 1st November, during a wander along the Chelsea Embankment: Whistler territory.  The great American painter was a local from 1859 until his death in 1903, and his ‘Nocturnes’ of the Chelsea/Battersea foreshore transform the Victorian industrial Thames into a Japanese world of shadows and fugitive lights. (Whistler was fond of applying musical terms to painting, so his nocturnes derive from Chopin: by the same token, Debussy was a fan and his orchestral Nocturnes return the compliment, evoking the Seine in the same mood as the painter’s Thames.)

James McNeill Whistler: Nocturne: Blue and Silver (Battersea Reach) 1872.

James McNeill Whistler: Nocturne: Blue and Silver (Battersea Reach) 1872.

James McNeill Whistler: Nocturne: Blue and Silver - Cremorne Lights, 1872.

James McNeill Whistler: Nocturne: Blue and Silver – Cremorne Lights, 1872.

James McNeill Whistler: Nocturne: Blue and Silver - Chelsea 1871

James McNeill Whistler: Nocturne: Blue and Silver – Chelsea 1871

 

James McNeill Whistler: Nocturne: Blue and Gold (Old Battersea Bridge) 1872-5.

James McNeill Whistler: Nocturne: Blue and Gold (Old Battersea Bridge) 1872-5.

The final nocturne was ‘The Falling Rocket’, a sort of proto-Abstract Impressionist take on fireworks at Cremorne Gardens, a pleasure garden located roughly where Lots Road Power Station is now. You don’t need me to tell you that this is the painting condemned by Ruskin in terms incendiary enough (I have seen, and heard, much of Cockney impudence before now; but never expected to hear a coxcomb ask two hundred guineas for flinging a pot of paint in the public’s face’) for artist to sue critic. Whistler won the case but was awarded joke damages and went bankrupt. No matter. Posterity has found in Whistler’s favour; he even has his own statue now, on the north side of Battersea Bridge.

James Abbott McNeill Whistler: Nocturne: Black and Gold (the falling rocket) 1875.

James Abbott McNeill Whistler: Nocturne: Black and Gold (the falling rocket) 1875.

This post is really a couple of years late, as there was a reportedly excellent show of Whistler’s Thames paintings at the Dulwich Picture Gallery. I say ‘reportedly’ because I was marooned on the south coast at the time and missed the bloody thing. But I’m back now, which is why I chanced to be walking along the Chelsea Embankment on Sunday night … (As it happens, I am writing this on Guy Fawkes night. Even in the pissing rain, I can look out of my 6th floor window and see the whole city lit up by sparkling lights. Some of them are even fireworks.) D.S.